Drive around your neighborhood and you will notice that modern homes are popping up like mushrooms after a rain. Amongst the craftsman, colonials, ramblers, Cape Cods and Tudor homes, modern and contemporary homes are dotting neighborhoods across North America at an increasing rate. The increased popularity of modern homes doesn’t sit well with everyone. From city zoning officials to some long term residence declaring NIMBY (not in my back yard), modern homes represent a blight on their neighborhoods that should be slowed or halted altogether. Yet more contemporary homes continue to be built and more people want to live in them. Modern design is on fire due to demographic and psychographic factors that can’t be easily halted. Get used to seeing more modern and contemporary homes, because the underlying factors and long-term trends predict the movement is here to stay.

multi family - easytrim reveals with clear anodized panel trims
multi family - easytrim reveals with clear anodized panel trims

Evolving Architecture

  • Major architecture of the last 3 decades strongly skews to modern including buildings like the Marilyn Monroe Towers in Toronto, the Rock and Roll Museum in Seattle or the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in New York. The style and WOW factor of these buildings are getting incorporated into large multi-family apartments, condos and university dorms. These buildings influence home buyers ideas regarding some of the architectural elements they’d like to see on their single family homes. Architecture as art and expression has successfully moved from large buildings, to large multi-family buildings to single family units. When is the last time you saw a Tudor home that took your breath away? Today’s home buyer wants a visually impactful home like the larger buildings they see all around them.
single family - easytrim reveals with clear anodized panel trims
single family - easytrim reveals with clear anodized panel trims

Self-Expression

  • Today’s society places more importance on individuality than conformity. People simply don’t want to be just another brick in the wall and living in a house that’s a carbon copy of the other homes in their neighborhood. That might have been cool in the 50’s, but not anymore. Increasingly, today’s home consumer wants their home to be almost like a second skin or outfit they wear to announce who they are in the world. Modern homes allow people to create that impression from scratch. No one likes showing up to a party where three other people are wearing their outfit. This desire to be viewed as unique now extends to the home we reside in and modern homes quench that thirst.
single family - easytrim reveals with black anodized panel trims
single family - easytrim reveals with black anodized panel trims

Millennials

  • Growing up in a world that believes new is inherently better than old, Millennials are predisposed to all things modern and that includes the homes they will buy or rent. Fueled to a large degree by evolving technology, many young digital citizens have grown up seeing and admiring contemporary architecture. They see it on Pinterest, on study trips abroad and scattered throughout pop culture. To this group, moving into a home that looks like their 60-year-old granddads is the definition of uncool. As Millennials move into their home-buying years they want homes that authentically stand apart from the crowd, draped inside and out with modern materials and furnishings just like the cool dorm they lived in at college or the ultra-contemporary home they saw in a movie they were streaming on Netflix.
single family - easytrim reveals with clear anodized panel trims

Age Defiance

  • Instead of embracing old age and going gently into that good night, Boomers and Gen X’ers are mounting a full-on assault against father time and the appearance of being old. In that well-funded fight, Boomers and X’ers enlist Botox, testosterone supplements, personal trainers and organic foods to resist aging. As they become empty nesters and abandon the homes they raised families in, many are seeking to downsize into a modern home. Still feeling young and hip, this demographic has the money to spend on the home they want as an outward expression of their personality and life’s accomplishments. Whether they sell the old home or commission an extensive renovation of their current home, Boomers and X’ers heavily skew towards contemporary design. Having a unique modern home that the young neighbors compliment on a daily basis is just another way to stay young yourself.
single family - easytrim reveals with clear anodized panel and LAP trims
single family - easytrim reveals with clear anodized panel and LAP trims

Blame it on demographics, blame it on the young, blame it on the old, the reality is that a variety of forces has lead us to this moment in time where modern and contemporary homes are more popular than ever and they’re here to stay.